Deborah Tavares: Whats happening in your town?

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Hacking Humans Part II: Remote Electronic Torture in the 21st Century

Hacking Humans Part II: Remote Electronic Torture in the 21st Century

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5G – City of Sebastopol, California – Telecommunication Ordinance

https://ci.sebastopol.ca.us/getattachment/Meeting-Event/City-Council/2019/City-Council-Meeting-April-16,-2019/Agenda-Item-Number-10-Telecommunications-ordinance-First-Reading-and-Introduction.pdf.aspx

The updated Sebastopol ordinance passed April 16, 2019. It does not stop 5G, there is NO moratorium on 5G in Sebastopol, but it does raise the bar in terms of what the telecom has to do to apply:


Telecom applicants must have an in person meeting with full completed applications.


Telecom applicants must hold public meetings prior to applying.


Telecom applicants must give notice of application to residents within 600 feet of the proposed site.


Antennas must be at least 1500 feet apart.


Antennas not in residential zones.
The Sebastopol Telecommunication Ordinance is 55 pages- and complicated, but above is the basic gist.
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California wildfire rips through nuclear waste site, fueling airborne toxin risk concerns – November 14, 2018

https://www.rt.com/usa/443903-wildfire-toxic-nuclear-site/?fbclid=IwAR2BxHqzIXDK5GL4o_qoJmD1dkujC-WjSlGcKmzj8CnD4bQLgK8l-7vl5dc

EXCERPT:

California wildfire rips through nuclear waste site, fueling airborne toxin risk concerns

California wildfire rips through nuclear waste site, fueling airborne toxin risk concerns
The Woolsey fire that engulfed over 90,000 acres in California last weekend may have spread toxic and radioactive substances from a Superfund site, according to activists who believe authorities might be downplaying the risks.

The fire passed through the Santa Susana Field Lab (SSFL), a federal Superfund site in the Simi Hills that was the site of the worst nuclear meltdown in US history in 1959. While the California Department of Toxic Substances Control said there was no reason to be concerned of “any risks other than those normally present in a wildfire situation,” locals aren’t so sure, pointing out that the agency has dragged its feet in cleaning up toxic sites and accusing it of a possible cover-up.

 

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Deadly Contaminated Water: Federal Judge Rules Flint Residents Can Sue EPA Over Water Crisis – Lead in the WATER . . .

Deadly Contaminated Water:  Federal Judge Rules Flint Residents Can Sue EPA Over Water Crisis – Lead in the WATER . . .

Federal Judge Rules Flint Residents Can Sue EPA Over Water Crisis    4/20/2019

Insider Comment:
One can only hope that the corrupt court system and the lawyers that work for the corrupt illegal corporate construct will actually really serve justice for the people.  Hope is all that we have!  And hope does NOT serve up justice in a world that is run by overlords set on population reductions.  This legal pursuit is a distraction while the folks in Flint are drinking contaminated water with lead added into the municipal water supply.  
Sue on and drink on – the system we ALL live in, whether you are white, black, red, yellow makes NO difference we are being exterminated. 
The secret agenda is to give hope, allow some big setbacks for both sides and then dump the whole cabal system for a whole new Cosmic Fascist/satanic system.
   
 
  1. Flint residents can sue the federal government over water crisis …

    3 days ago … Flint residents can sue the federal government over water crisis, judge rules …. government in connection with the city’s water crisis, a federal judge ruled. The lawsuits claim the Environmental Protection Agency was too slow …
  2. Flint residents allowed to sue EPA over lead water crisis, judge rules …

    3 days ago … Flint residents allowed to sue EPA over lead water crisis, judge rules … Residents of Flint, Michigan, can sue the Environmental Protection Agency … Eastern District of Michigan ruled April 18 that people in Flint are free to sue …
  3. Federal Judge Rules Flint Residents Can Sue EPA Over Water Crises

    11 hours ago … As Flint, Michigan, marks five years since the city’s deadly water crisis began, a federal judge ruled in favor of residents who want to sue the …
  4. Judge rules Flint residents can sue federal government over water …

    4 days ago … Judge rules Flint residents can sue federal government over water crisis … the federal government over its response to the city’s drinking water crisis. … Residents have long blamed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) …
  5. Flint R

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WEATHER READY NATION – Get READY for the NEXT Targeted Attack of Weather Weapons:

The National Weather Service provides up-to-date emergency preparedness information for a variety of natural hazards, including severe storms. The tips and tools provided on this platform can help communities better prepare for approach storms, thus reducing the damage they cause and enabling faster recovery.

 

http://www.weather.gov/wrn

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United Nations – Managed and Forced “Migration” Policy Division Due to Climate Change

United Nations – Managed and Forced “Migration” Policy Division 
Due to Climate Change
https://www.iom.int/migration-and-climate-change

Migration, Environment and Climate Change (MECC) Division

The International Organization for Migration (IOM)as the leading intergovernmental migration agency, has been at the forefront of operational, research, policy and advocacy efforts, seeking to bring environmental migration to the heart of international, regional and national concerns in collaboration with its Member States, observers and partners.  

You are heThe International Organization for Migration (IOM),as the leading intergovernmental migration agency, has been at the forefront of operational, research, policy and advocacy efforts, seeking to bring environmental migration to the heart of international, regional and national concerns in collaboration with its Member States, observers and partners.

International Organization for Migration (iOM’s) Mandate

Since 2007, member states requested IOM within its governing bodies to work on migration, environment and climate change. At the beginning of 2015, a dedicated Migration, Environment and Climate Change (MECC) Division was created to address the migration, environment and climate nexus. This institutional change has formalized IOM’s engagement in this thematic area, making IOM the first international organization to have established an institutional unit fully devoted to this topic. The Migration, Environment and Climate Change Division, within the Department of Migration Management has the institutional responsibility to oversee, support and coordinate the development of policy guidance for activities with a migration, environment and climate change dimension.

IOM’s Vision

IOM recognizes the necessity to step up national, regional and international efforts to address human mobility challenges associated with environmental factors and climate change. IOM’s vision on migration, environment and climate change is that contemporary migration governance, policy and practice must reflect the significance of environmental, disaster and climate change factors on human mobility. Environmental factors must be integrated across all areas of migration management, such as: prevention, preparedness and response to displacement, border management, labour migration and integration, and return and reintegration.

IOM’s Objectives

IOM’s objectives concerning migration, environment and climate change are:

  • To prevent forced migration that results from environmental factors to the extent possible;
  • To provide assistance and protection to affected populations when forced migration does occur in situations of environmental and climate change, and to seek durable solutions to their situation;
  •  To facilitate migration in the context of climate change adaptation and enhance the resilience of affected communities.

Sustainable development is recognized as an integral part of this approach, implemented through disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and environmental sustainability measures.

IOM’s Activities

IOM engages in policy work and advocacy, research, capacity building, and operational activities in the area of migration, environment and climate change in collaboration with IOM Member States, observers and partners.

Policy

IOM supports international policy, advocating for the recognition of the migration, environment and climate change nexus in key global and regional policy processes. IOM also supports State-led efforts to develop specific solutions to address these complex challenges at the national level.

Research

IOM has been conducting research in the area of migration, environment and climate change since the early 1990s to support the development of evidence-based policy and practice. IOM regularly publishes reports on migration, environment and climate change, and makes the latest international research on this topic available through the Environmental Migration Portal’s Research Database and Policy Brief series.

Building Capacities to Address Environmental Migration

IOM’s capacity building programme for policy makers on migration, environment and climate change focuses on enhancing the understanding of the complex issue of managing migration in the context of climate and environmental change; and linking the many policy areas that are relevant to addressing environmental migration, including migration, climate change adaptation, environment, development, security and disaster risk reduction. Trainings are aimed to build capacity of national, regional and international policy makers and practitioners. IOM also engages in awareness raising and communications for general public through a variety of communication channels on social and traditional media.

Operational Activities

Since 1998, more than 1,000 projects have been funded and implemented worldwide by IOM to respond to and address environmental migration and disaster displacement, demonstrating that creative solutions exist for communities affected by disasters, environmental degradation and climate change, and that migration does not have to be a “last resort” solution but can also be a positive driver for change.

Environmental Sustainability

IOM recognizes that a healthy environment is intrinsically linked to the well-being and resilience of migrants and host communities. In 2017, IOM launched its institutional programme of work on environmental sustainability. It made an institutional commitment to improve the sustainability of its operations at the strategic, programmatic and facility levels, focusing on three key areas: greenhouse gas emissions; water; and waste management.

IOM’s Partnerships

IOM is committed to close collaboration with all relevant stakeholders to develop comprehensive strategies to better manage climate and environment induced migration, to address its challenges and to take advantage of the opportunities it presents. IOM partners with stakeholders including governmental institutions, UN agencies, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s), academic institutions and private sector institutions in support of its research, policy and operational objectives. 
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Executive Order Regarding the Ocean Policy to Advance the Economic, Security, and Environmental Interests of the United States

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-regarding-ocean-policy-advance-economic-security-environmental-interests-united-states/

EXCERPT:

 

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1.  Purpose.  The ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes waters of the United States are foundational to the economy, security, global competitiveness, and well-being of the United States.  Ocean industries employ millions of Americans and support a strong national economy.  Domestic energy production from Federal waters strengthens the Nation’s security and reduces reliance on imported energy.  Our Armed Forces protect our national interests in the ocean and along the Nation’s coasts.  Goods and materials that support our economy and quality of life flow through maritime commerce.  Our fisheries resources help feed the Nation and present tremendous export opportunities.  Clean, healthy waters support fishing, boating, and other recreational opportunities for all Americans.

This order maintains and enhances these and other benefits to the Nation through improved public access to marine data and information, efficient interagency coordination on ocean-related matters, and engagement with marine industries, the science and technology community, and other ocean stakeholders.  To advance these national interests, this order recognizes and supports Federal participation in regional ocean partnerships, to the extent appropriate and consistent with national security interests and statutory authorities.

Sec2.  Policy.  It shall be the policy of the United States to:

(a)  coordinate the activities of executive departments and agencies (agencies) regarding ocean-related matters to ensure effective management of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes waters and to provide economic, security, and environmental benefits for present and future generations of Americans;

(b)  continue to promote the lawful use of the ocean by agencies, including United States Armed Forces;

(c)  exercise rights and jurisdiction and perform duties in accordance with applicable domestic law and — if consistent with applicable domestic law — international law, including customary international law;

(d)  facilitate the economic growth of coastal communities and promote ocean industries, which employ millions of Americans, advance ocean science and technology, feed the American people, transport American goods, expand recreational opportunities, and enhance America’s energy security;

(e)  ensure that Federal regulations and management decisions do not prevent productive and sustainable use of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes waters;

(f)  modernize the acquisition, distribution, and use of the best available ocean-related science and knowledge, in partnership with marine industries; the ocean science and technology community; State, tribal, and local governments; and other ocean stakeholders, to inform decisions and enhance entrepreneurial opportunity; and

(g)  facilitate, as appropriate, coordination, consultati

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