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ENERGY TRANSITION: An Inside Look at a Groundbreaking Solar-Storage Procurement in California | Greentech Media

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/inside-california-community-energy-providers-groundbreaking-solar-storage-p?utm_medium=email&utm_source=GridEdge&utm_campaign=GTMGridEdge

An Inside Look at a Groundbreaking Solar-Storage Procurement in California

Early this month, three community-choice aggregators and one municipal utility serving much of California’s San Francisco Bay Area launched a 30-megawatt distributed energy storage-plus-solar solicitation.

 

 

Read more “ENERGY TRANSITION: An Inside Look at a Groundbreaking Solar-Storage Procurement in California | Greentech Media”

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The Navajo Generating Station Coal Plant Officially Powers Down. Will Renewables Replace It? | Greentech Media

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/navajo-generating-station-coal-plant-closes-renewables?utm_medium=email&utm_source=GridEdge&utm_campaign=GTMGridEdge

The Navajo Generating Station Coal Plant Officially Powers Down. Will Renewables Replace It?  November 20, 2019

One of the nation’s largest coal plants permanently powered down this week after the owners determined it would be uneconomical to continue operating the facility as natural gas and renewable energy prices continue to drop.

The Navajo Generating Station (NGS) officially shut off at 12:09 p.m. on November 18 when long-time employee Fred Larson opened the Unit 2 breakers, according to the plant operator, Arizona utility Salt River Project (SRP). The plant had been operating since the mid-1970s on land leased from the Navajo Nation, located east of Page, Arizona.

 

 

Read more “The Navajo Generating Station Coal Plant Officially Powers Down. Will Renewables Replace It? | Greentech Media”

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KISS YOUR FUEL GOOD BYE: The Navajo Generating Station Coal Plant Officially Powers Down. Will Renewables Replace It? | Greentech Media

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/navajo-generating-station-coal-plant-closes-renewables?utm_medium=email&utm_source=GridEdge&utm_campaign=GTMGridEdge

The Navajo Generating Station Coal Plant Officially Powers Down. 

Will Renewables Replace It?

One of the nation’s largest coal plants permanently powered down this week after the owners determined it would be uneconomical to continue operating the facility as natural gas and renewable energy prices continue to drop.

The Navajo Generating Station (NGS) officially shut off at 12:09 p.m. on November 18 when long-time employee Fred Larson opened the Unit 2 breakers, according to the plant operator, Arizona utility Salt River Project (SRP).  The plant had been operating since the mid-1970s on land leased from the Navajo Nation, located east of Page, Arizona.

The closure raises questions about the future of SRP’s energy mix and the extent to which renewables will meet the utility’s energy needs. It also presents a new set of challenges and opportunities for the Navajo Nation, which hosted the coal plant for more than 40 years and relied on it for revenue. When the decision to close NGS was made two years ago, over 500 employees were working at the plant — more than 90 percent of whom are Navajo.

The head of SRP framed the closure as a difficult but necessary decision based on “shifting economics” within the energy industry.

“NGS will always be remembered as a coal-fired workhorse whose employees made it one of the safest and most reliable power plants in the nation,” said SRP CEO and General Manager Mike Hummel.

In 2017, the owners of NGS decided to shutter the 2,250-megawatt coal plant after its lease with the Navajo Nation was scheduled to expire in late December.

SALT RIVER PROJECT – SRP owns 42.9 percent of NGS, with another 24.3 percent owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Other partial owners include Arizona Public Service, NV Energy and Tucson Electric Power.

Over the next three years, contractors will carry out demolition and reclamation duties at the NGS site as they have at many other coal plant sites across the country. The U.S. Energy Information Administration found that between 2010 and the first quarter of 2019, U.S. power companies announced the retirement of more than 546 coal-fired power units, totaling roughly 102 gigawatts of generating capacity. An additional 17 gigawatts of coal-fired capacity is expected to retire by 2025.

Natural gas and a massive solar-charged battery

According to an SRP spokesperson, the public power entity is primarily replacing its share of NGS’ generating capacity with natural gas from the Mesquite and Gila River power plants as well as some additional new solar resources.

Last week, ahead of the Navajo coal plant retirement, SRP announced the purchase of two new solar and battery storage plants, making it one of the largest investors in energy storage in the country.

The Sonoran Energy Center will comprise a 250-megawatt solar array coupled with a 1-gigawatt-hour energy storage system located in Arizona’s Little Rainbow Valley. The Storey Energy Center will be an approximately 88-megawatt solar and energy storage system, located south of Coolidge.

“These integrated solar and storage plants will allow SRP to meet its summer peak demand, reduce carbon emissions, and provide clean energy to our customers while optimizing energy output using state-of-the-art battery technology,” Hummel said in a statement.

The projects were chosen as part of a recent “all-source” solicitation for 600 megawatts of capacity that will help SRP hit its goal of adding 1,000 megawatts of new solar to its system by 2025 and meet customer needs going forward.

Both plants are scheduled to come online by June 2023 and will be owned and operated by subsidiaries of NextEra Energy Resources.

SRP, which is governed by its own elected board, has been criticized for not moving as fast as other Arizona utilities in adopting renewable energy resources. Recent announcements mark a shift in focus. Executives announced last year that SRP would add more solar and batteries to its grid in an effort to save money and reduce reliance on natural gas. At the time it had only 200 megawatts of solar power.

SRP also has a goal to reduce the amount of carbon emissions it generates per megawatt-hour by more than 60 percent by 2035 and by 90 percent in 2050.

Still, natural gas will make up the bulk of the missing capacity from the retired Navajo Generating Station. SRP purchased one block of the Gila River Power Station in 2016 and two 550-megawatt natural-gas generating units at Gila Station in 2017. The Mesquite plant purchase was made in 2012.

The good news for renewables is that SRP currently has a significant amount of baseload capacity available to help the grid remain reliable, which means that it can add a lot more solar before it starts to face some of the long-term problems utilities face when adopting a large amount of renewables, according Colin Smith, a senior analyst at Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables.

“SRP absolutely will be able to add more solar to the grid without disrupting their overall generation load,” he said.

“The biggest question, I think, is about lost jobs,” Smith added. “Solar, realistically, is only going to provide some short-term construction jobs as opposed to long-term jobs for engineers and people working at the coal plant.”

The human cost

The jobs impact from the NGS closure will disproportionately affect members of the Navajo Nation, who made up the vast majority of the coal plant’s workforce.

Clean energy entrepreneur Brett Isaac, who is Navajo and whose family still lives in the territory, is hopeful that renewable energy development will be able to create significant opportunities and lasting impact for his community.

A founder of Navajo Power, a Public Benefit Corporation developing clean energy projects on tribal lands, Isaac said he and his team are taking an inclusive approach to energy planning and designing their projects to generate long-term revenue streams for the tribe.

The two-year-old company is currently focused on deploying solar projects larger than 100 megawatts but over time plans to build a robust distributed energy business, which is more labor-intensive. The Navajo Power team believes it could develop up to 10 gigawatts of renewable energy on the Navajo Nation in Arizona and New Mexico, which would be a boon for the community and support a shift to new technology jobs.

Navajo Power has already secured land for its projects and is working to complete environmental reviews and establish offtake agreements for the large solar projects it plans to build. But the process of building support has been a challenge.

Convincing utilities, corporations and states that used to buy power from the Navajo Nation to sign new offtake agreements for projects located on tribal lands has been tough in the wake of the NGS closure. Engendering confidence within the Navajo Nation has been difficult as well.

Dealings with the “energy [industry have] been traumatic [for] indigenous communities,” said Isaac. “We don’t want to replicate things that have happened in the past [so] they lose their faith in the industry and…[become] resistant to the transition.”

He noted that the NGS coal plant closure has had a “human cost.” It took more than a year for NGS owners to finalize negotiations around closing the plant, putting plant workers and their families in a prolonged state of limbo.

In addition to employment issues, operating budgets for the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe have relied on royalties from the Generating Station and from coal mines on their lands.

The Kayenta Coal Mine, which rolled its last trainload of coal to NGS in late August, used to purchase $9.9 million worth of electricity each year from the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority. The same month, the Peabody-owned mine laid off the last 265 of its workers, many of them members of the Hopi and Navajo tribes.

The transition

SRP and other NGS owners took several steps to limit the impact on tribal communities, according to SRP spokesperson Scott Harelson.

On the job front, SRP offered all 433 regular employees the opportunity to “redeploy” at other SRP facilities; nearly 300 accepted. SRP and other stakeholders in Arizona are also supporting a Re-Employment Center that will offer career training, certification programs and other job-seeker assistance.

In addition, the owners signed a 35-year extension lease with the Navajo Nation for plant retirement activities after 2019 and long-term monitoring. Arrangements were also made to allow for the ongoing operation of the transmission system on the Navajo Nation.

“Under the extension lease, the NGS owners will make lease payments totaling approximately $110 million to the Navajo Nation,” according to SRP.

The Navajo Nation will also take ownership of the remaining NGS assets, including a warehouse, lake pump system and railroad. The closure agreement also gave the tribe rights to transmission capacity at NGS. SRP said a federal government pledge to provide 500 megawatts of transmission capacity from the NGS system is valued at more than $80 million.

But according to Isaac, the Navajo Nation is still recovering decades’ worth of decisions that limited economic development and revenue generation in the region. Unemployment rates remain high, and roughly 15,000 homes on the Navajo Nation still don’t have power.

“And yet they have big 500-kilovolt power lines running over their homes,” he said.

A community-backed move to renewables

Attitudes around energy are shifting on the Navajo Nation. Communities that once opposed renewable energy development, viewing it as a threat to their coal jobs, now understand that alternative energy resources present new opportunities in a shifting energy landscape.

SRP is already working with the Navajo Nation to develop renewable energy on Navajo land and has partnered with the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority on the Kayenta I and Kayenta II solar power plants — the first large-scale solar projects in the territory — totaling approximately 60 megawatts of capacity.

Meanwhile, Navajo grassroots groups are tracking progress on the coal plant cleanup effort and continuing to urge Navajo Nation leaders to move away from the polluting resource. Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez appears to be heeding those calls.

Last Friday, the president refused to financially back bonds needed by the tribal energy company Navajo Transitional Energy Co. for three newly acquired coal mines located outside the reservation. Nez said the company was not transparent in its dealings and that the deal would put the tribe in a tricky financial position in the wake of coal plant closures and mining company bankruptcies.

The following day, Nez visited Navajo Power’s clean energy site and pledged to help the company get permits for its projects and find an offtaker for the power they generate.

“The leader appreciated that Navajo Power went through getting the proper consents from the community…and [is] going about it in a way that’s not trying to overstep or create conflict,” said Isaac.

While clean-energy advocates are looking to write a new chapter for Arizona following the NGS shutdown, there are some things they can learn from coal’s legacy, he added.

“Coal miners and plant operators have pride in what they’re doing,” Isaac said. “Solar can learn from that and create champions within the community — only this time, they can own the process while contributing to a cleaner environment.”

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World Bank: Power Outages and NO More Diesel for Backup Power Generators . .

World Bank  
 
Power Outages 
and
 No More Diesel 
for Backup Power – Generators 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-018-0151-8?WT.feed_name=subjects_environmental-impact

Abstract

Many with access to electricity in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are subject to frequent outages due

 

Read more “World Bank: Power Outages and NO More Diesel for Backup Power Generators . .”

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City council to discuss ordinance to phase out natural gas appliances in SLO

Kiss Your Gas Good Bye 
 
City council to discuss ordinance to “phase out” 
 
natural gas 
 
appliances in SLO – San Luis Obispo, California

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KISS YOUR GAS GOOD-BYE CLIMATE CHANGE PLANS REVAIL NO NEW PETROL OR DIESEL CARS AFTER 2030

Climate Change Plans Will See Cars, Homes And Towns 
Shaken Up
 
Climate Action Plans – set out “radical” reforms
 
Insider Comment:
 
While what you will read in the article after this insider comment talks about Ireland keep in mind these plans have been adopted in your city, town, state, nation, island, country WORLDWIDE.
 

The plan bans the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030. Those remaining on the road after 2030 will not be issued new NCT certificates after 2045.

 
The NCT is the National Car Test.
 
This is conducted by a private company to determine that a car is roadworthy.
 
An example of how this works is the story – on the radio – of a man with an older car, low miles, in impeccable condition. His car failed the NCT because it did not have airbags. The point is the car was roadworthy and they refused to pass it putting the man off the road and rendering his car worthless. This is how a private company will control transport. 
 
Thus, they will eventually be able to retire all gasoline / diesel cars based on precedent and dictat.
 
If you don’t have the money for an electric car, you’re out of luck and you’re forced to use public transport. Of course you’re tracked and exposed to the Tetra and other wireless as well as 5G / 6G frequencies. 
 
Currently all newer cars have a QRS chip which allows them to be tracked. (Nobody asked for a QRS chip but you pay for it anyway.)
 
There is a story of a farmer in Cork, Ireland.  One night as he neared home he decided to visit his neighbour on the farm next to his. They shared a couple of drinks and as he made his way back to his farm he drove off the road and the airbags were deployed. Since no one was hurt and there was no damage done to anybody’s property, he decided to walk the short journey to his own farm, thinking he would collect the car in the morning. Around 3 a.m. there was a knock on the door. It was the police. The police asked if he was the owner of the car in question?  The police told him they had received a call FROM THE MANUFACTURER that the airbags had deployed. The man was charged with drunk driving.
 
I’m not sure what happened but the point is that if the man is found guilty, it sets a precedent. Under European law, it becomes applicable across the entire European Union.
 
We are further along the road to control of all transport than anyone realizes.
 
PLEASE LEARN MORE and go to StopTheCrime.net to the YouTube Video’s and watch the latest schemes that the documents describe.
 

CLIMATE CHANGE PLAN SEES NO NEW PETROL OR DIESEL CARS AFTER 2030 AND NO NCT FOR POLLUTING CARS AFTER 2045

The end of petrol and diesel cars in Ireland, as well as the end of oil and gas boilers in homes, has been announced by the Government as part of a new climate change plan.

In a dramatic bid to tackle climate change, and meet our EU targets on emissions, councils will be handed the power to restrict access to certain parts of towns and cities to zero-emissions vehicles only, under the ambitious new environmental plan.

And no petrol or diesel cars will be sold after 2030, with all such vehicles effectively banned from the road by 2045.

The new climate change plan will see no petrol or diesel cars will be sold after 2030, with all such vehicles effectively banned from the road by 2045. Pic: Rollingnews.ie : Sam BoalThe plan also says that a ‘roadmap’ will be developed, with a mix of taxation and subsidy policies in order to entice people to move toward electric cars.

According to the Government’s Climate Action Plan, revealed yesterday by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Environment Minister Richard Bruton, a regulatory framework will be developed on low emissions and parking pricing policies to provide local authorities with the enhanced powers.

The Department of Transport will this year commission a review of the plan and recommend appropriate responses for Dublin, Cork, Galway and Limerick in Ireland.

The Government’s Climate Action Plan was revealed yesterday by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar. Pic Gerard McCarthyThe Climate Action Plan contains 180 measures to lower the country’s carbon emissions, including incentives to encourage drivers to switch to electric vehicles, retro-fitting gas boilers in homes, increasing the carbon tax, and a scheme to sell any electricity a home generates back into the grid.

The Government’s plan aims to reduce Ireland’s overall carbon emissions by 20% by 2030 before becoming carbon neutral by 2050.

The plan bans the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030. Those remaining on the road after 2030 will not be issued new NCT certificates after 2045.

The plan bans the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2030. Pic: Collins DublinThe Government’s aims to have 950,000 electric vehicles on the road by 2030 and is planning to vastly increase the number of charging stations which currently service around 10,000 electric vehicles across the country.

This will include more than 90 high-powered chargers along the national road network, the installation of 50 new fast chargers, and the replacement of over 250 standard chargers.

From 2025, new non-residential buildings with more than 10 parking spaces will have at least one recharging point installed. There will also be a minimum number of recharging points required for all existing non-residential buildings with more than 20 parking spaces.

Tax deadline

The Government’s aims to have 950,000 electric vehicles on the road by 2030. Pic: ShutterstockA government source told Extra.ie‘Giving local authorities new powers to restrict certain areas to low emission vehicles would allow local authorities to make a positive impact on air quality and cut emissions.’

The plan also proposes a number of measures for other sectors.

There will be an effective ban on the installation of oil boilers from 2022, and on the installation of gas boilers from 2025, in all new dwellings through the introduction of new regulatory standards for home heating systems.

Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Richard Bruton TD. Pic: Gareth Chaney CollinsThere is also a plan to retrofit 400,000 homes and businesses with heat pumps, replacing existing oil and solid fuel boilers.

Carbon tax is set to rise to at least €80 per tonne by 2030, which will be incrementally increased over successive budgets.

A new microgeneration scheme will also be introduced, allowing homeowners to generate their own electricity and sell what they don’t use back to the grid.

The plan calls for the elimination of non-recyclable plastic and the introduction of higher fees on the production of materials which are difficult to recycle.

The proposal, in line with new EU rules, also calls for the implementation of a ban on single-use plastic plates, cutlery, straws, balloon sticks and cotton buds.

The proposal also calls for the implementation of a ban on single-use plastic plates, cutlery, straws, balloon sticks and cotton buds. Pic: ShutterstockThe Government aims to move to 70pc renewable energy by 2030.

On the plan, the Taoiseach said: ‘We are making change now, before it is too late. We recognise that Government doesn’t have all the answers. So we will work with people, industry and communities to chart the best and most inclusive way forward.’

Minister Richard Bruton said the Government needed to act now to leave a ‘better, healthier, more sustainable Ireland for future generations’.

‘This plan sets out radical reforms, which will cut our reliance on carbon, making our businesses more competitive, our homes more sustainable and our farms more efficient,’ he said.

Reacting to the Climate Action Plan, Sinn Fein’s Climate spokesman Brian Stanley said: ‘The Government does not have an ambitious enough action plan for renewable energy. We want to see our economy transition to a green economy. This has to be done in a manner that protects lower income families and ensures that ordinary people do not carry an unjust share of the burden.’

 

 

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Santa Rosa council considers requirement for new homes to be independent of natural gas

https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/8899687-181/santa-rosa-council-considers-requirement

Santa Rosa council considers requirement
for new homes to be independent of natural
gas
Santa Rosa may soon require that new homes be equipped to operate without natural gas,
a shift city leaders hope could cut carbon emissions and lend momentum to greenbuilding
designs gaining favor after last year’s destructive wildres.
The City Council late last month directed sta
members to research and draft an “allelectric-ready”

Read more “Santa Rosa council considers requirement for new homes to be independent of natural gas”

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