Facebook’s new cryptocurrency could really change the world

https://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/facebook-s-new-cryptocurrency-could-really-change-the-world-1.876460?utm_source=sfmc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2691557_Agenda_weekly-21June-Staff&utm_term=&emailType=Newsletter

There was no mention of Bitcoin in Facebook’s announcement about Libra, the company’s forthcoming digital currency, or the white paper explaining how it will work. However, it was cited in the accompanying technical documents as both a reference point and an example of what Libra will not be.

 

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How will 5G internet change the world?

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/03/how-will-5g-internet-change-the-world/

At the recent Mobile World Congress, 5G was all the rage. The Economist described the next generation of mobile networks as something that will “offer users no less than the perception of infinite capacity.” The rollout of 5G is expected to enable and widely disseminate technologies, such as: the Internet of Things, self-driving cars, autonomous drones, and Star Wars-inspired hologram phones. What was considered science-fiction just a decade ago is currently being prototyped, tested, and piloted. A $1 billion investment in a New Mexico “ghost town”speaks for itself. And, as we enter the era of 5G, the formerly futuristic gadgets might just become commonplace.

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Governments may be big backers of the blockchain – Land grab

https://www.economist.com/business/2017/06/01/governments-may-be-big-backers-of-the-blockchain

Land grab Governments may be big backers of the blockchain

An anti-establishment technology faces an ironic turn of fortune

IN THE hills overlooking Tbilisi, Georgia’s capital, sits a nondescript building housing rows of humming computer servers. The data centre, operated by the BitFury Group, a technology company, was built to “mine” (cryptographically generate) bitcoin, the digital currency. But now it also uses the technology underlying bitcoin, called the “blockchain”, to help secure Georgian government records. Experts are eyeing the experiment for proof of whether blockchain technology could alter the infrastructure of government everywhere.

While the blockchain originally sought a foothold in financial services, and digital currencies attracted early attention from investors, now interest in using the technology in the public sector is growing. Brian Forde, a blockchain expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, argues that governments will drive its adoption—an ironic twist for something that began as a libertarian counter model to centralised authority. Backers say it can be used for land registries, identity-management systems, health-care records and even elections.

 

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WORLD BANK – Top 7 disruptive technologies for cities

https://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/top-7-disruptive-technologies-cities

Top 7 disruptive technologies for cities

Top 7 disruptive technologies for cities (Photos via Shutterstock)

Imagine you were working in development and poverty reduction in the early 1990s (I was!). Only one website existed in all the world in August 1991 (today there are over 1.5 billion). Mobile phones were expensive, rare, and clunky. Very few would anticipate a situation in which India would have more mobile phones than toilets.

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Report from Sonoma County Board of Supervisors 6/13/2019 . . . They Admit to Having No Jurisdiction

From:  Deborah Tavares

 
Report from Sonoma County Board of Supervisors, 6/13/2019, in Northern California – 60 miles North of the Golden Gate Bridge.
 
NOTE:  The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors stated they were front men for the state that hides behind the board and mandates the regulations that local agencies must implement.
 
Definition:  Our local, state and federal governments are a network of corporate agencies posing as governments, and they are not.
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page1image416

Susan Gorin, First District David Rabbitt, Second District Shirlee Zane, Third District James Gore, Fourth District Lynda Hopkins, Fifth District

Thursday, June 13, 2019

SONOMA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA

8:00 AM

575 ADMINISTRATION DRIVE, ROOM 102A SANTA ROSA, CA 95403

Sheryl Bratton, County Administrator Bruce Goldstein, County Counsel

Board of Supervisors Chambers 575 Administration Drive 102A

___________________________________________________________________________________________
I attended this county board meeting and was told open public comment was yesterday, not today.
 
So I remained and commented during each agenda item and worked my information into the record – archived.
 
Keep in mind I know the County is Incorporated and does not serve the people.  The function of the boards are to appear to conduct local business, however, they are merely allowing UN policies to roll into place without the people learning the facts.  I understand we are USA, Inc. and EARTH, Inc.  and the illusion of government for and by the people is to merely to keep the herd from rebelling.  
 
Therefore, I know public comments amount to nothing and are merely tolerated by the corporate governing bodies.  
 

These meetings are DELPHI Meetings whereby the agendas and plans have already been approved.


The agenda item below, as copied from the county website, is followed by what I witnessed at the meeting.   
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5. Russian River Total Maximum Daily Load Action Plan Comments 2019-0986

Authorize the Chair to sign and submit comments approved by the On-Site Wastewater Treatment System Ad Hoc to the Regional Water Quality Control Board related to the 2019 Draft Staff Report and Draft Action Plan for the Russian River Pathogen Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) by the June 24, 2019 deadline.

Department or Agency Name(s): County Administrator and Permit and Resource Management

________________________________________________________________________________________________
The section above is the agenda item that is referred to in my discussion as follows:
 
The board discussed the “big financial hammer” that was going to come down upon 49,000 parcels that are on septic systems.  The board noted and at times even laughed at the idea that many of these people will be coming in with pitch forks.  These unsuspecting property owners whose properties are located within 600 feet of the Russian River water bodies have no idea what the North Coast Regulatory Water Control Board has in store with fees and inspections and implementing a costly monitoring plan. (this river area flows along part of Bohemian Grove in Northern California)
 
The board said these plans will be “phased in slowly” and bring people into compliance to the new requirements from the State of California.
 
One of the city staffers, Nathan, said “the public has a right to know a big hammer is coming towards them.”
 
They spoke about providing maps, but also said individual property owners could enter in their property parcel number and find out if they are in the targeted area.  Certainly, by each owner checking separately the community may not learn of the LARGE number of parcels ready to be monitored and assessed fees.  It is also possible that many properties will NOT be in compliance and NOT be able to meet the new requirements.  What then?    
 
I asked where we could get a copy of the new state regulations, NOW.  I was told by Supervisor James Gore go online – go to the North Coast Regulatory Water Control Board (TMDL)  Originally there were 70,000 parcels facing these undisclosed septic regulations, and only 49,000 parcels have been already identified. ALREADY!  Neither he property owners or occupants know what’s coming.
 
I told the Board this was a sneak attack upon people in the Russian River area who have just incurred massive damage from recent floods impacting thousand of homes.  I said insurance coverage for flood related damages are typically not available and FEMA denied any assistance that was asked for by the County to assist with flood recovery.  I said, many of these people may even lose their properties due to lack of insurance and increasing costs.
 
Further, I told the Board we/they are in a war economy due to the FIRES and the New Normal of Climate Change which is Climate Control which will have even greater financial impacts from weather and more frequent storm and fire events.
 
The board said the state comes out with regulatory changes and places the board members in front of angry people as the state bureaucrats hide behind the board members.   The board said they get the brunt of citizens anger when putting forward the states regulations that they do not control.  
 
It is important to note that I spoke on this item, the ONLY public comment.  Most importantly I said that the board members were admitting they have NO Jurisdiction and are only putting forth state policies.  They agreed and said the state mandates policies upon the local governments what the Federal Government mandates the states.
 
My time was up!
 
Important to note:  Since my last “waste of time” at the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors meeting the County has deployed TSA style scanning and hired two security guards that examine all attendees prior to being allowed to enter the meeting hall. 
 
Please observe your local city and county agencies level of increased security, to protect them from us – as more statutes, regulations and limiting resource accessibility comes down on all of us “like a hammer.”
 
These comments are from my notes and the best of my recollection . .
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Globots and telemigrants: The new language of the future of work

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/06/globots-and-telemigrants-the-new-language-of-the-future-of-work/

Globots and telemigrants: The new language of the future of work

The Port of Liverpool building is seen reflected in the windows of a modern office block in Liverpool northern Britain, September 16 , 2015.  The Port of Liverpool building was built in 1907 and is the former home of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board. REUTERS/Phil Noble    - LR2EB9G12UFD7
Richard Baldwin explains how globalization means more opportunities for the nation’s most competitive citizens.
Image: REUTERS/Phil Noble

Globotics. Telemigrants. White-collar robots. To describe the future of work, Richard Baldwin is developing a new lexicon.

 

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List of Fires Statewide – they are non-stop and in mostly rural areas 24/7

https://fire.ca.gov/incidents/

This map provides locations of major emergency incidents in California. Locations are approximate. Some incidents on the map are not in the jurisdiction of CAL FIRE and are under the command of another local or federal fire agency. Information is updated as timely as possible, but may not reflect real-time conditions.

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WATER – a DEADLY LIE Being Spread by the CONtrollers

We Are “NOT” Running Out of WATER – Water IS a Renewable – Do Not be Tricked
 
Learn More – Go to PrimaryWater.org  
 
Listen to the You Tube video “Primary Water Explained”
 
Choose LIFE – Choose TRUTH
 
________________________________________
 
 
In India -Chennai’s the latest city to have almost run out of water, and other cities could
follow suit – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) – Media Psyops

Chennai’s the latest city to have almost run out of water, and other cities could follow suit

Posted 

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

This video file cannot be played.(Error Code: 224003)

Video: Chennai authorities have introduced a token system to stop fighting over water. (ABC News)

Chennai is a city that has withstood the rise and fall of empires, but it now faces a grave existential crisis as it runs dry due to a severe water shortage, leaving millions in the lurch.

This week, taps ran dry as water levels in its four major reservoirs fell to one-hundredth of what they were this time last year, caused by a devastating drought.

The crisis in India’s sixth-largest city — with a population bigger than Melbourne and Sydney combined — has pushed schools, hotels and commercial establishments to close, while hospitals have put off non-essential surgeries.

Millions of people are lining up at water trucks to fill containers of water in a crisis that’s hit urban and rural Indians alike, and usually only half leave with their pots filled.

But the problem isn’t confined to Chennai — in the western state of Maharashtra, some are so desperate for water they are lining up their pots two days before water tankers are due to arrive.

Children as young as 10 were being sent to fetch water a train ride away, hauling back containers of water almost as big as they were.

While India faces its worst long-term water crisis in its history as demand outstrips supply, its story is one that is becoming increasingly common in rapidly urbanising countries around the globe.

Urbanisation and poor planning drive water scarcity

Abroad, climate change — coupled with rapid urbanisation and population growth — have brought issues around water scarcity and security into focus.

Amid this context, attention has been cast on how municipal authorities have mismanaged the responses to these mounting ecological crises.

Cape Town, a city of more than 4.2 million people in South Africa, faced its worst water crisis in history between 2015 and mid-2018.

As dam levels fell to record lows, some at less than 10 per cent, authorities prepared for Day Zero — where taps were to be shut off with citizens restricted to 25 litres per day.

In Northern Africa, the Egyptian capital of Cairo could run out of water because Ethiopia is damming the Nile River, which currently provides the city with 97 per cent of its water supply.

In the United States, damming of the Colorado River — combined with a 19-year drought — has led some officials to determine that some reservoirs fed by the river will never be full again.

The Colorado stretches across the southwest of the country, being a source of water for some of the region’s biggest cities such as Los Angeles, San Diego and Las Vegas.

In Asia, 3.4 billion people could be living in “water stressed areas” by 2050, according to a 2016 Asia Development Bank (ADB) report.

“Water shortage should be treated as a permanent ongoing issue,” said Thuy Trang Dang, an urban development and water specialist at the ADB’s Southeast Asia office.

Diets filled with more water-demanding meat and dairy products and general growth in consumption also mean “the issue will only become more pressing unless dealt with not as a one-time crisis but as a way of life”, she said.

Australia, the world’s driest inhabited continent, not immune

Australia is the world’s driest inhabited continent.

Over centuries, Australia’s environment has absorbed a number of dry spells, but recent pressures are disrupting a traditionally resilient environment.

The Murray-Darling Basin — a vast river system that stretches across South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland — faces severe stress as a result of drought and what a 2019 royal commission said was due to “gross maladministration”.

“Australia has an uncertain climate that looks like it may be becoming drier in the south, where the majority of the population live,” says Ian Wright of the University of Western Sydney.

Experts have said that Cape Town-style crisis could theoretically play out in Perth, which shares the problem of a drying climate.

The construction of two large desalination plants, however, will likely mean that the West Australian capital is better prepared for climate change than its South African counterpart.

Melbourne, which previously only had a year’s supply of water at the height of the Millennium Drought, also has a desalination plant.

The plant, combined with a pipeline fed from the Goulburn River in Victoria’s north, now have the potential to supply over half of the city’s water.

But according to a report from Melbourne Water in 2017, projections show that it is possible the city’s demand for water could exceed the capacity of its existing sources of water by 2028.

Melbourne could be facing shortfalls of more than 450GL (almost the entire volume of Sydney Harbour) per year by 2065, if water resources weren’t managed well, it said.

Chennai tells the story of a changing world

Part of the reason for Chennai’s current predicament is due to its groundwater depletion, a situation that government think-tank Niti Aayog warned about last year.

It said it was one of 21 cities that it thought could run out of ground water by 2020.

India uses more ground water than any other country, a problem successive governments have failed to tackle, said environmental campaigner Himanshu Thakkar.

“We use more groundwater than what China and the United States collectively use,” Mr Thakkar said.

“Countries like the US identify and protect their groundwater recharge zones. What have we done?”

But Chennai’s groundwater depletion isn’t the sole reason for its current crisis, as drier climatic conditions have exacerbated water scarcity.

Drought followed a 62 per cent shortfall in monsoon rains last year compared to 2017, according to government officials.

Meteorologists said monsoon rains usually cover two-thirds of the country by mid-June. However, they currently have reached less than half that area.

But the monsoon’s progress is expected to pick up in the next 10 days.

Poor rainfall has ravaged crops, dried up reservoirs and forced people to migrate from their villages.

In Maharashtra, many have gone to work farming sugar cane — a thirsty crop that devours two-thirds of its irrigation water, exacerbating the problem.

Meanwhile, in northern and eastern parts of India, temperatures soared to 48 degrees Celsius.

In one eastern state, Bihar, at least 90 people have died of heat stroke this month alone.

The state of Tamil Nadu, where Chennai is located, has asked other states across the country for spare water until monsoon rains fall.

ABC/Wires

Topics: droughtenvironmentwaterwater-managementclimate-changewater-supplyindiaasiasouth-africanswaustraliaunited-states

 

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Race Horses are Dying of Nuclear Causes and HUMANS are Dying OUR Corporate Governments LIE and Watch US DIE

https://rense.com/general96/santa-anita-horses-are-dying-of-nuclear-causes.php

Shimatsu – ‘The Man From Soma-Han’

Although by no means a jockey, I’ve ridden horses along the Sierra Nevada as a boy, in Japan in my teens, and in adulthood through the Nepalese Himalayas and in the Gobi and Kumtag Deserts. There was a moment in time when a murderous gang of smugglers was chasing me up a slope in the Mustang region of Nepal, but my little mountain horse hopped like a bullfrog up the rocky slope leaving the bad guys and their Arabian stallions in the dust. After the close call, that black horse was happily galloping along the gravel of the Kali Gandhaki, River of the Death Goddess, with me, both arms outstretched, letting go of the reins that waved in the wind and whooping in wild abandon.

 

 

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