Managed retreat – Wikipedia (Planned Retreat)

Tollesbury Managed Realignment site in Essex, the first large scale attempt at salt marsh restoration in the UK

In the context of coastal erosionmanaged retreat (also managed realignment) allows an area that was not previously exposed to flooding by the sea to become flooded by removing coastal protection. This process is usually in low-lying estuarine areas and almost always involves flooding of land that has at some point in the past been claimed from the sea.

In the UK, managed retreat is often a response to sea level rise exacerbated by local subsidence of the land surface due to post-glacial isostatic rebound in the north.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Managed_retreat

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Managed retreat of coastal communities: understanding responses to projected sea level rise: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management: Vol 55, No 4

Managed retreat of coastal communities: understanding responses to projected sea level rise

Managed retreat – the relocation of homes and infrastructure under threat from coastal flooding – is one of the few policy options available for coastal communities facing long-term risks from accelerated sea level rise. At present, little is known about how the Australian public perceives policy options to mitigate sea level rise risks. This paper explores a range of different decision-making criteria used to assess a managed retreat scheme. A metatheoretical social functionalist framework is used to make sense of personal concerns elicited from an online survey asking respondents to consider a managed retreat scheme. The framework proposes that people can act intuitively as scientists, economists, politicians, prosecutors and theologians, when considering a complex topic such as managed retreat policy. The research found that the survey respondents are more likely to consider the topic of managed retreat from multiple functional perspectives than from a single functional perspective. The type of social functionalist frameworks that people used to assess the Conditional Occupancy Rights scheme was found to be influenced by their perceptions of sea level rise risk. The findings have implications for public debates about the long-term risks of sea level rise and for engaging with the community about managed retreat policy options.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09640568.2011.604193

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Adaptation planning for sea level rise: a study of US coastal cities: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management: Vol 60, No 2

Adaptation planning for sea level rise: a study of US coastal cities

Sea level rise (SLR) is expected, even without greenhouse gas emissions. As SLR is inevitable, adapting to its impacts has received increasing attention, and local governments are the key actors in this emerging agenda. This study indicates that adaptation planning for SLR should be integrated into two local major planning mechanisms in the United States: the local comprehensive plans and hazard mitigation plans. By evaluating 36 plans from 15 US coastal cities that are considered at high risk and vulnerable to rising sea levels, the results demonstrate that SLR is widely identified, but the overall quality of the plans to address it requires significant improvement. A detailed table of selected plans’ characteristics is also provided as a lens on how localities tackle this challenging issue. The paper concludes with planning suggestions for coastal communities to better adapt to SLR.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09640568.2016.1151771?src=recsys&journalCode=cjep20

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Can California coastal managers plan for sea-level rise in a cost-effective way?: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management: Vol 59, No 1

Planned Retreat:  Can California coastal managers plan for sea-level rise in 
 
a cost-effective way?: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management: 
 
Vol 59, No 1

Los Angeles’s Venice Beach could lose $450 million in tourism revenue by 2100 with a 1.4 m SLR scenario while San Francisco’s Ocean Beach would lose $80 million, but the impacts to structures could total nearly $560 million at Ocean Beach compared to $50 million at Venice Beach.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09640568.2014.985291?src=recsys&journalCode=cjep20

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