UTISM Report in Ireland: (including Asperger Syndrome) in School Age Children in Northern Ireland 2017

AUTISM Report in Ireland: (including Asperger Syndrome) in School Age Children in Northern Ireland 2017 . .
Insider Comment:
AUTISM –  is an Environmentally Created Spectrum Disorder – intentionally induced
My prior research here in the USA, Inc.  showed the DOD’s monitoring of those on the spectrum through special programs that most parents sign their children up for.   The DOD tracks and monitors for the success of the creation of autism – I have a high functioning granddaughter . . .I know what this means . . .
These and many now grown up autistic people are lacking the gene of empathy a perfect slave to dish out  the inhumane policies of the controllers whose plan it is to kill all humans and all life on earth. . .

 

EXCERPTS From the Above PDF:

Autism

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with and relates to other people and how they experience the world around them. Autism is often described as a ‘spectrum disorder’ because the condition affects people in many different ways and to varying degrees.

 

Asperger Syndrome

Asperger Syndrome is similar to autism; however people with this condition do not generally experience the same language and learning disabilities associated with autism. They are more likely to have difficulties in the areas of social imagination, social communication and social interaction.

Autism Act (Northern Ireland) 2011

The Autism Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 required the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety to lead on the development; implementation; monitoring and reporting of a cross- departmental Autism Strategy. The Autism Strategy (2013 – 2020) and Action Plan (2013 – 2016) was subsequently approved by the Northern Ireland Executive and launched in January 2014.

Children in urban areas were 1 1⁄2 timesmore likely to be autistic than those in rural areas . . . see page 11 in the PDF . . . (The difference in the proportion of children identified with autism in urban and rural areas at a regional level were statistically significant. This means that it is unlikely that the difference has occurred by chance alone.)

Data from this publication is used to monitor the delivery of social care services to children, to help assess Health and Social Care (HSC) Trust performance, corporate monitoring, to inform and monitor related policy, and to respond to parliamentary/assembly questions. The bulletin is also used by academics/ researchers, the voluntary sector and those with an interest in the Autism Strategy and Action Plan.

This publication is Crown copyright and may be reproduced free of charge in any format or medium. Any material used must be acknowledged, and the title of the publication specified.

Statistics and research for the Department of Health is provided by the Information and Analysis Directorate (IAD). It comprises four statistical sections: Hospital Information, Community Information, Public Health Information & Research and Project Support Analysis.

Autism is a developmental disability that influences a person’s ability to communicate and relate to other people, as well as affecting how they make sense of the world. It is a spectrum condition, meaning that while all people with autism will have similar problems, overall their condition will impact them in different ways. Some people may be able to lead independent lives while others will require a lifetime of specialist support. Asperger Syndrome is a similar condition to autism; however these children do not generally experience the same language and learning disabilities associated with autism. They are more likely to have difficulties in the areas of social imagination, communication and interaction.

The need to develop and improve health and social care services for people of all ages who are affected by autism (including Asperger Syndrome) has been apparent for some time. In order to provide effective services, knowing the incidence and prevalence of this condition is clearly important. This report aims to show the prevalence of autism amongst children of compulsory school age (4–15 year olds at the start of the school year), as it is clear that autism persists and that children with autism become adults with autism, each with their own particular needs.

The inequality gap continues to grow with autism levels 42% higher in the most deprived decile compared to the Northern Ireland average during 2016/17

1 Refers to all children of compulsory school age (4 – 15 years old) 2 Special Educational Needs

The figures extracted from the Northern Ireland School Census show that the estimated prevalence of autism within the school aged population has increased by 1.3 percentage points, from 1.2% in 2008/09 to 2.5% in 2016/17.

Males are 4 TIMES more likely to be autistic than females . . .
The 2016/17 Northern Ireland School Census follows the pattern outlined above with figures showing that 3.9% of males were identified with autism compared to 1.0% of females.

Looking at Years 2–4 (6–8 year olds) in 2016/17 there is a steady rise in the prevalence rate of autism. This may indicate that most identification of autism is occurring when children are aged between 6 and 8 years old.

63% of children with autism were at Stage 5 of the Special Educational Need Assessment:

Implements a five stage approach to the identification of children with learning difficulties, the assessment of their educational need and the making of whatever special educational provision is necessary to meet those needs. The initial three stages are dealt with by the school, while at stages 4 and 5 the education authority shares responsibility with the school. Children are reviewed on a yearly basis and may move up or down the assessment scale, depending on performance.

The autism prevalence rate in both the Belfast and South Eastern HSC Trusts has been consistently higher than the Northern Ireland average between 2008/09 and 2016/17. The rate of prevalence in the Northern HSC Trust was higher than the Northern Ireland average in each of the last three years, and has also had the largest percentage increase in the number of children identified as having autism in the past year.

14%

of children identified with autism were living in the most deprived decile of Northern Ireland

During 2016/17, 14% of children identified with autism were from the most deprived decile in Northern Ireland, while 8% of children identified with autism were located in the most affluent decile of the country.

The rate of autism in the most deprived decile was 42% higher than the Northern Ireland average

The following analysis of the autism inequality gap was carried out through the NI Health & Social Care Inequalities Monitoring System (HSCIMS)12 within the Department of Health which provides in-depth assessment of inequality gaps across a range of health and social care indicators.

The simple gap analysis, below, shows that the rate of autism in school aged children in the most deprived decile in Northern Ireland stood at 3,570 cases per 100,000 population in 2016/17. This was over a third higher than the rate in the least deprived decile (2,432 cases per 100,000 population).

Data Collection:

The information presented in this bulletin derives from the ‘Northern Ireland School Census’ collected by the Department of Education (NI). All pupils on the rolls of grant-aided primary, post-primary and special schools were included in this return comprising each child who was a registered pupil in a school in October of each given year and who attended for at least one day.

The Census collects a large amount of information including demographic data, free school meal entitlement, looked after children numbers, newcomer children numbers and assessment data. This includes disability and a breakdown of those children identified with autism.

The data extracted from the ‘Northern Ireland School Census’ for use in this publication includes the number of children identified with autism (including Asperger’s Syndrome) by Health and Social Care (HSC) Trust, multiple deprivation measure, urban/rural split, gender and school year.

Data from this bulletin meets the information requirements of a wide range of internal and external users. It is used to monitor the delivery of social care services to children, to help assess HSC Trust performance, corporate monitoring, to inform and monitor related policy, and to respond to parliamentary/assembly questions. The bulletin is also used by academics/researchers, the voluntary sector and those with an interest in autism.

Special Educational Needs (SEN) Assessment Stages

Stage One

Teachers identify and register a child’s special educational needs and, working with the schools special educational needs (SEN) co-ordinator, take initial action.

Stage Two

The (SEN) co-ordinator leads in collecting and recording information and for co-ordinating the child’s special educational provision.

Stage Three

Teachers and the SEN co-ordinator are supported by specialists from outside school.

Stage Four

The Education Authority considers the need for a statutory assessment and may make a multi- disciplinary assessment.

Stage Five

The Education Authority consider the need for a statement of special educational needs; if necessary it makes a statement and arranges, monitors and reviews provision.

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In 2016/17, the rate of autism amongst children in the 10% most deprived areas stood at 3,570 cases per 100,000 population which was more than two-fifths (42%) higher than the regional average (2,509 cases per 100,000 population), and 47% higher than the rate in the 10% least deprived areas (2,432 cases per 100,000 population).

Social Gradient:

Health and social care inequalities are oft

en considered in terms of the gap between the most and least deprived quintiles/deciles of the population. However, this does not account for those areas of intermediate levels of deprivation that may also be relatively disadvantaged to some degree. This is reflected in the Marmot Review14 which demonstrated that there is a social gradient in health and its wider determinants that runs from top to bottom of the socioeconomic spectrum. The social gradient is also a global phenomenon whereby socio-economic factors have considerable impact on the health and mortality of populations in low, middle and high income countries. The social gradient in health means that inequalities affect everyone.

 

 

 

 

 

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